Resurrection Blast

It isn’t time to cry or mourn. It’s time to have some fun.

Children, see the empty tomb, each and every one.

The treasure’s really cool. There’s no body buried there.

The women wept all night, but now they’ve no time to despair.

Off come the funeral clothes. They’ve got the greatest news to share.

 

As they came near the spot, it’s true, those gals were feeling grim

About the stone that sealed the tomb where they had buried Him.

To move the thing would take more strength than all of them combined.

Yet on that dark and lonely road, and to their task resigned,

(for with a solemn sadness they were hopelessly aligned)

 

They talked among themselves. “Who’s going to roll that thing away?”

But to the angel swooping down, the task was child’s play.

The soldiers cried in fear and fainted when they saw his face.

The earthquake woke them up, though, and they bolted from the place

The sixteen men who failed to guard the tomb feared sure disgrace.

 

Let’s watch it in slow motion, kids. You’re sure to have a blast.

See them scramble, see them fall. They’re running really fast.

They nearly knock the ladies over in their zeal to flee.

“Watch where you’re going!” cries a Mary. “Can’t you blind guys see?”

“It may be dark out, but that’s no excuse to bang my knee!”

 

“Hey, aren’t those guys the guards that Pilate placed around that tomb?”

They shake their heads and mutter, as they watch the fellows zoom.

The women too had felt the quake while walking up that hill.

Their thoughts were not on wonders though, but on the bitter pill

They had to swallow when He died. In their hearts, they felt ill.

 

Just picture their amazement when they saw the stone removed

When the angels said “He’s risen,” oh how must they have been moved!

It was no pirate’s treasure they’d unearthed inside that tomb.

No dead men’s bones would be found there, no shades of gloom or doom.

But there’s a hidden message in the walls, if you’ll make room.

 

So, hurry, kids. Let’s share the fun, because He’s coming soon!

 

 

 

Advertisement

Do Worship Traditions Entertain or Train Us?

Do our worship traditions entertain or train (in righteousness)?

Dimmed lights enhance the atmosphere, but where’s the Sabbath rest?

Are we in church for entertainment or do we want God’s best?

What is the goal of worship? Is it to train for spiritual war

Or to do religious motions? What have we come here for?

 

Do our worship traditions mean much or do we do them in vain?

We can sing to please the masses and repeat a fine refrain.

But does it bring us to the God who can sustain?

We know His Word is powerful to save, deliver, heal,

But if it doesn’t show His love, then what does that reveal?

 

Do our worship traditions entertain or train in righteousness,

Or, in some instances, do such traditions cause distress?

“You’ve made the scriptures to have no effect through your tradition,”

Jesus told the men bound in religious superstition.

Had their worship turned into a music competition?

 

For God’s Word was in their minds but yet it wasn’t in their heart.

The Holy Spirit’s presence they neglected to impart.

 

Though in the seat of Moses, a position of respect,

They had no power to cast out demons, heal, or resurrect.

When Jesus healed the man who suffered from a withered hand,

They hated His authority. To have Him killed they planned.

Therefore, it seems their worship really wasn’t all that grand.

 

For God desires worship both in spirit and in truth,

But fleshly worship ends in death. It doesn’t bear good fruit,

Because when it’s man-made, then self-reliance soon sets in,

With defiance of God’s will, and then no one can win.

It’s like a heavy Jeroboam golden calf idol of sin.

 

Such church traditions entertain, but band members aren’t called.

Just anyone can join the team. The godly are appalled,

For graven ways of doing things drain power from the church,

And truly gifted people find themselves left in the lurch,

Shut out by praise that’s dry. It’s not the well for which they search.

 

And what if Christ should suddenly appear within our church?

Would we like how we’ve portrayed the One for whom the sheep do thirst?

For if we say “believe for wonders” but don’t show them many,

Aren’t some likely to conclude, “They really haven’t any”?

https://miracle-times.com/healing/king-jesus-superhero-healer/

Entertaining or Training (In Righteousness)?

Dimmed lights enhance the atmosphere, but where’s the Sabbath rest?

Are we in church for entertainment or do we want God’s best?

What is the goal of worship? Is it to train for spiritual war

Or to do religious motions? What have we come here for?

 

It’s fun to please the masses and attract them to our church,

But have we truly led them to the Christ for whom they search?

We know God’s Word is powerful to save, deliver, heal,

But if it doesn’t show His love, then what does that reveal?

 

“You’ve made the scriptures to have no effect through your tradition,”

Jesus told the men bound in religious superstition.

God’s Word was in their minds but yet it wasn’t in their heart.

The Holy Spirit’s presence they neglected to impart.

 

Though in the seat of Moses, a position of respect,

They had no power to cast out demons, heal, or resurrect.

When Jesus healed the man who suffered from a withered hand,

They hated His authority. To have Him killed they planned.

 

And what if He should suddenly appear within our church?

Would we like how we’ve portrayed the One for whom the sheep do thirst?

For if we say “believe for wonders” but don’t show them many,

Aren’t some likely to conclude, “They really haven’t any”?

Bucking Religious Tradition

God wasn’t in the crashing drums or squeaky, loud guitar.

He wasn’t in the microphone that set my ears ajar.

He wasn’t in the whirlwind of religious-sounding prayer,

Or the fancy pictures on the screen that they put there.

He wasn’t in the “Clap now,” “Stand now,” “Sit down in your chair.”

 

He wasn’t in the motions they commanded us to do

Or the bright thundering video announcements, not a few.

He wasn’t in the vain, robotic “Say this after me.”

He wasn’t in the flashy lights (I counted twenty-three).

He wasn’t in the fanfare or the sparkling pageantry.

 

The only place that I could find Him was upon one knee,

As I ignored the sights and sounds and worshiped fervently.

While listening to the message, I asked God for clarity,

And in the stillness of my heart, I heard Him speak to me.

“I want to share a meal with you. Now share a meal with me.”

 

And as the flashy lights faded into obscurity,

I closed my eyes and tuned my ears to heaven’s symphony

Which resonates the praises of the One who set us free.

The words upon the screen took on new meaning just for me

As I spent some time alone with Him in all simplicity.

Medicine for an Insane World, Part II

Rough living under Pharaoh’s whip,

Backbreaking toil in his grip.

To free the people, God sent Moses,

With whom the king would not touch noses.

 

“Allow the Jews a day of rest

Just so that they can have a fest?

You sure do have a lot of nerve!

Hard labor is what they deserve.”

 

“Deliverance I shall not grant,

No matter how you rave and rant.

The lazy bums shall have no peace.

Their burdens I shall now increase.”

 

“They are in bondage to my laws.

To make bricks, they must grasp at straws

But still produce the same amount.

My men shall not reduce the count.”

 

He was a very unfair king

Who left his subjects suffering.

The “go-fers” scattered everywhere

To glean the grain he would not share.

 

So much confusion, panic, fear,

A sad career devoid of cheer.

No matter how well they behaved,

From his wrath they could not be saved.

 

That’s what it’s like when ruled by sin.

You always lose and never win.

To live that way is scatterbrained.

You just exist but aren’t sustained

 

Upon the tread mill you will run,

A life of strife that’s never fun.

One joins the rat race to survive,

Gains worldly goods but doesn’t thrive.

 

That’s why the Father sent His Son

Into the world. His work is done.

Upon a cross, He took our place

And paid for our sins with His grace.

 

They placed his body in a cave.

Within three days He beat the grave.

Death bows to him and so should we,

Because He is our victory.

 

If we believe, then we’ll be saved

No matter how well we’ve behaved.

Do you have battles you can’t win?

Would you escape the yoke of sin?

 

The Lord in His great sovereignty

Says, “All ye weary, follow me.

I’ll keep you safe and set you free.

Let Me be your security.”

 

 

 

 

 

Afraid to Forgive

Tormented, grieved, forsaken. Oh, what pain he felt inside,

Beset by views of ugly news, from which he could not hide!

He knew he should dismiss past hurts still screaming to avenge

The wrongs that so besieged his heart, but he desired revenge.

 

“It’s closure I must have,” he said. “That is the path to peace.

For only then can I enjoy the fruit of sweet release,

And satisfy the anger which has locked me in this cage.

To free myself from prison, I must first appease my rage.”

 

Such thoughts, like sharp two-edged swords, clashed wildly inside his mind;

Chaotic clangs, with violence tinged, set to a beat unkind.

He did not see the torturers whose pitchforks, dipped in fire,

Stirred coals of shame inside his heart to magnify his ire.

 

“It’s not your fault,” they told him, “for the way they treated you.”

“Your hatred’s justified. Those were such awful things to do!”

But still the guilt kept hounding. He could not escape the blame.

“You too have sinned horrifically, and ridiculed God’s name.”

 

Fear gripped his heart with condemnation he could not ignore.

If God was mad at him, then there was nothing to live for.

He knew he must forgive and must forget but was afraid

That he’d get stolen from again and never be repaid.

 

He didn’t trust the sovereign Lord to care for all his needs,

But bought the lie that debt forgiveness rests upon good deeds,

He said, “I’m doomed to earn my bread by my own toil and sweat,

Let him who owes me foot the bill. Let him repay the debt.”

 

But what a yoke to put upon an ordinary man!

He knew it wasn’t right, and yet he had no better plan.

His blood pressure was through the roof, he wasn’t feeling well.

Then suddenly a light shone in the darkness of his cell.

 

The Son of God was standing there. His glory filled the room.

“I paid your debt in full,” He said. “Why all this gloom and doom?”

“I thought you were a hard man, Sir,” replied the man, amazed.

“I thought I must fend for myself, for that’s how I was raised.”

 

“But now I see it isn’t so. There’s no cause for alarm.

For, though you’re greatly to be feared, you’d never do me harm.”

“That’s right,” said Jesus. “All I ask of you is to believe,

In my unfailing goodness trust, and of my grace receive.”

 

“Remember how I shed my blood to wash away your sin.

In me, there’s life. In man, there’s death. Stick with me and you’ll win.”

“Why ask a man to pay you back for all the things he stole,

When, by my stripes, you can be healed?  For I will make you whole.”

 

And the moral of this poem is that forgiveness involves trusting God to pay back what the enemy stole from you, instead of demanding that some fallible human being supply your need. Yes, God can use people to provide for you, but they’re just tools in His hands. Our trust must be in Him, for He alone is faithful to the end.

 

 

Continue reading “Afraid to Forgive”